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Five Nights @ Freddy’s

The+film+is+based+off+a+wildly+popular+horror+video-game+that+was+originally+released+in+2014.
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The film is based off a wildly popular horror video-game that was originally released in 2014.

Review: Five Nights At Freddy’s
***SPOILERS AHEAD***
While a horror video game starring robot animal-humanoids might seem questionable at first, eight versions later, Five Nights at Freddy’s (FNAF) has emerged as one of the most adored video game series ever. Its recent movie adaptation premiered just a couple of weeks ago on October 27th. No jump scare was more surprising than its sudden success; it has already achieved the second-largest box office opening of any video-game movie adaptation ever. Starring Josh Hutcherson, the film has captivated the game’s extensive fanbase while introducing the franchise to a whole new audience.
The story centers around a troubled young adult, Mike, unable to land a job to support himself and his kid sister Abby. He is forced into taking the role of a night-time security guard at Freddy’s Fazbear’s Pizza, a run-down, Chuck E. Cheese-style pizzeria housing uncanny killer robots called animatronics. As Mike explores the unsettling environment of his new job, he is forced to confront sudden flashbacks of his younger brother’s kidnapping while eventually discovering the dark secrets lurking behind the animatronics.
The film’s defining aspect was its eerie aesthetic. The animatronics are brought to life through special effects, really emphasizing the complexity of their characters. Although the animatronics don’t show much emotion, the times they do, they are especially creepy due to their uncanny resemblance to humans. Paired with the dark and mysterious environment inside the pizzeria, the characters and setting create the perfect amount of suspense to truly make this a horror film.
The numerous plot twists throughout the whole film, further make it an intriguing watch. Abby’s unexpectedly peaceful relationship with the animatronics can be confusing at first but later is clarified after Vanessa, a police officer who is suspiciously informed about the pizzeria’s lore, tells Mike the story of the missing kids who went inside the once-joyful restaurant. While I was invested in this storyline, I was not prepared for William Afton, the Yellow Rabbit, to be revealed as the central antagonist during the ending, which I, unfortunately, found anticlimactic and abrupt. I enjoyed the twist of Abby turning the animatronics on Afton by crossing his face out on the drawings, but I was hoping for a different ending where one of the animatronics is perhaps Mike’s long-lost brother.
On the other hand, the chemistry between Vanessa and Mike adds an especially interesting element to the overall movie. Their interactions feel genuine and provide a refreshing break from the main storyline. What makes it even better is how seamlessly the romance blends with the central plot. The relationship between Mike and Abby reflects a similar innocence. Mike’s care for his little sister contrasts with the horror components of the film, and so, the final plot twist of Abby defeating the Yellow Rabbit becomes that much more shocking. Mike’s relationship with Vaness and Abby reflects the importance of loyalty to your family and friends, as they could be the ones to save you in the end.
Certain parts of the movie feel unnecessary, such as when Aunt Jan hires a group to break into the pizzeria. Although this part does portray the animatronics’ violent side when these people are brutally slaughtered inside the store, the scene could have easily been taken out. Additionally, some parts, such as William Afton’s backstory, could have been more developed. His story has a tremendous effect on the final plot twist, yet is not touched upon much and remains unclear, even after the film’s conclusion.
While this is a fun movie to watch during Halloween, if you are looking to be scared, this film will most likely not do the trick. Its reliance on fast cuts and zoom-ins is easily missable and simply not scary. As a PG-13 film, this film also lacks the gore of a traditional horror movie and could be considered one solely catered to kids. However, it is a great movie for a child’s introduction to the horror genre, as it is more entertaining than frightening. I would give this film a solid 7 out of 10, but for the younger audiences or FNAF enthusiasts, that rating could easily shoot up to an 8 or even 9.

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