Anonymous, Class of 2017

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Anonymous, Class of 2017

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This election concerns me for many reasons. What you’re about to read is not advocacy for or against a candidate. Instead, it’s my reflection on the election as a whole. It saddens me that so many Americans did not actually like either candidate and thus only voted for who they view as “the lesser of two evils.” Is that really how we should chose our President? Don’t people have the right to like at least one of the candidates that MIGHT represent them? Also, now that Trump is the President-Elect, people speculate that he may not actually follow through with some of his alleged plans. Why have elections become more about absurdity and entertainment than informative information? American citizens should value substance, but do they? Why isn’t the media explaining policies to voters? A majority of voters don’t look beyond their Facebook feeds and television channels for presidential information. In my opinion, the media has the responsibility to INFORM voters, not to entertain them. Why aren’t we setting a higher standard for our levels of factual knowledge?
What concerns me even more are people’s habitual responses to beliefs that counter their own. Many young people today believe that if something bothers them — whether it be an opinion, an activity, or a feeling — it needs to be shut down. They don’t need to tolerate people who disagree with them. They don’t need to empathize with different ideas. They don’t need to deal with problems and feelings that are difficult. If it makes them uncomfortable, it should just go away. People declare themselves as “educated” and therefore “correct,” but who’s to say that the other side isn’t just as “educated” and just as “correct”? Why do people think their judgement is superior? For example, I disagree with Trump’s social viewpoints and will never adopt them as my own, but that doesn’t give me the right to say that other people, under no circumstances, can agree with him. I do not have the right to declare my opinion as the universal fact and yell at people for not agreeing with me. Unfortunately, many of my friends engage in immature arguments when they don’t get their way.
I, by no means, am discouraging people to stand up for what they believe in. In fact, I believe that people should advocate for what they believe in and should scream their beliefs from the rooftops — just not in a way that prohibits others from doing the same. The beauty of America is that everyone is allowed to fight for their beliefs — don’t take that right away from people. The most effective way to fight for your beliefs is to clearly and respectfully explain them to others. Nobody is going to listen to you if you yell at them. Lastly, many people are posting “Donald Trump is not my President”. However, Donald Trump IS our President, whether or not you like him — There is nothing you can do to change that.
Look into what you can do to make your voice heard in the next 4 years. Look into local government and advocacy organizations. And whatever you do, don’t wish that Donald Trump fails and that you can say “I told you so”. Trump is “the captain of the ship that we’re all on”, so for the sake of our country, I hope he succeeds. We cannot go backwards and change the results of the election. All we can do is enter the future with open minds and open hearts and remember that no matter who the President is, we each have the power to promote real change.